Cortoss bone augmentation material

Cortoss material was developed to provide an ideal bone augmentation solution for treatment of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs).

Features

Cortoss is an advanced, injectable, synthetic, non-resorbable biomaterial which mimics the mechanical properties of cortical (weightbearing) bone1. It has been clinically proven to match the safety and effectiveness of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) for vertebral augmentation.2

  • Flow and fill: properties improve short-term pain and long-term function2

  • Safety: low incidence of adjacent fractures2; minimal exotherm3 and monomer release4

  • Control: procedural flexibility with mix-on-demand and start/stop delivery5

  • Robust compilation of clinical data2,6,7

Multi-center clinical trials provide the proof:

  • The safety and efficacy of Cortoss material has been demonstrated in three U.S. clinical investigations and multiple European studies.2,6,7
  • In patients with a first-time fracture at one level, there was a 43% reduction in adjacent level fractures in the patient population that used Cortoss material2,1
    In patients with a first-time fracture at one level, there was a 43% reduction in adjacent level fractures in the patient population that used Cortoss material21In patients with a first-time fracture at one level, there was a 43% reduction in adjacent level fractures in the patient population that used Cortoss material21
  • Compared to PMMA, Cortoss material is more hydrophilic, which enables it to coat and augment the internal structure of the vertebral body.2 This interdigitating characteristic resulted in a 30% reduction in material injected when compared to PMMA in a controlled study2
  • The level 1 IDE Study showed a statistically significant increase in the percentage of patients experiencing a reduction in short-term pain at 3 months and improvement of long-term function at 24 months2
    The level 1 IDE Study showed a statistically significant increase in the percentage of patients experiencing a reduction in short-term pain at 3 months and improvement of long-term function at 24 months2